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SUBMITTED BY:  Sandra White Hinton (transcribed by Cheri Todd Molter and Caitlin Crenshaw)

(Note from Sandra: “Here are Lal’s letters. Please do upload them. His handwriting is so neat! All the Whites were educated, and they were all Masons, as well.”)

Lallister M. White, or “Lal”, was born in Sampson County, North Carolina. He was a farmer before the Civil War started. On April 20, 1861, when Lal was twenty-eight years old, he enlisted in the Confederate Army and served in Company A of the 30th Infantry (North Carolina). On Sept. 3, 1863, he was promoted to First Lieutenant. On May 12, 1864, Lt. Lal White was killed at Spotsylvania Court House, Virginia.

Transcription from the original:

Dark[e]sville Va.
July 19, 1863
Murdock:

Dear Brother: not having in many days written you I deem it a suitable time this evening to give you some idea of what Gen. Lee’s army is doing since we recrossed the potomac [sic] in to Virginia. We are now resting near the town above mentioned here in the valley of Virginia. There is at this time some rumor in circulation that we are soon to cross the potomac [sic] again into Maryland & Pennsylvania, but as for that I am unable to say, though there is some probability of such a move. It would not surprise me in the least if we do return to Maryland et al. I am very sorry that the Governor of our fair state has been compeled [sic] to make a call for 7000 men, for state defence [sic]. I am fearful that James & yourself will stand a chance of being called out, yet I suppose that your services are only needed for Six months, which time will soon pass by. I am sorry that our state is so invaded. I do sincerely hope that you will have a pleasant time. I should like to be with you at Home for a short time and see your fine flourishing crops et al. I am satisfied that your swamps and up land is very good. But alas; I can not [sic] even think of Coming home again during this war if I have good health. I am fearful that no furloughs will be granted for any one [sic] owing to the immergency [sic] of the timez [sic]. We have much to contend with this summer for we have a powerful enemy to hold in check & drive back unless times get better you need not look for me home. I received a letter from Bro. O.P. White who is at this time lying very ill with the fever. I suppose that he is in a bad condition. I do hope you will go and see him if you possibly can, for the poor fellow may need some assistance that you can render him. If you can not [sic] go probably you can get William C. Butler to go. [H]e is in general Hospital No 10 Richmond. probably he may write you before you get this letter, his letter to me was of the 7th Just at that time the Doctors had failed in breaking his fever. The letter was not in his hand writing So I judge he is very low.

very respectfully
Your Brother
L.M. White

Transcription with modern spellings and punctuation:

Darkesville, [W.V.]
July 19, 1863
Murdock:

Dear Brother: Not having in many days written you, I deem it a suitable time this evening to give you some idea of what Gen. Lee’s army is doing since we recrossed the Potomac into Virginia. We are now resting near the town above mentioned here in the valley of [West] Virginia. There is at this time some rumor in circulation that we are soon to cross the Potomac again into Maryland & Pennsylvania, but as for that, I am unable to say, though there is some probability of such a move. It would not surprise me in the least if we do return to Maryland et al. I am very sorry that the Governor of our fair state has been compelled to make a call for 7000 men, for state defense. I am fearful that James & yourself will stand a chance of being called out, yet I suppose that your services are only needed for six months, which time will soon pass by. I am sorry that our state is so invaded. I do sincerely hope that you will have a pleasant time. I should like to be with you at Home for a short time and see your fine flourishing crops et al. I am satisfied that your swamps and up land is very good. But alas; I cannot even think of Coming home again during this war if I have good health. I am fearful that no furloughs will be granted for anyone owing to the emergency of the times. We have much to contend with this summer for we have a powerful enemy to hold in check & drive back unless times get better you need not look for me home. I received a letter from Bro[ther] O. P. White who is at this time lying very ill with the fever. I suppose that he is in a bad condition. I do hope you will go and see him if you possibly can, for the poor fellow may need some assistance that you can render him. If you cannot go, probably you can get William C. Butler to go. [H]e is in general Hospital No 10 Richmond. Probably he may write you before you get this letter; his letter to me was of the 7th. Just at that time the Doctors had failed in breaking his fever. The letter was not in his handwriting, so I judge he is very low.

Very respectfully,
Your Brother,
L.M. White

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