Submitted by Sandra White Hinton: Letter Transcribed by Sandra White Hinton and Cheri Todd Molter

OP letter March 20 1863

Original Transcription:

 

Pocotaligo                                                  Pocotaligo So. Ca.

March 20th 1863

James White Jr.

Dear Bro, I Recd. your Communication also one from Farther [sic] which I was highly gratified to learn that Bro. Murd. was improving also that all of Our families were in good health. as for myself, I have been very sick for four or five days I am much better to day tomorrow I Shall Resume my business. I merely write this thinking that you all would here [sic] of it and cause Farther to be oneasy [sic]. So I hope from the way that I feel now that I will be as harty [sic] as ever though this is a very Sickly Region of Country and I hope we will not stay here long but we must be contented when ever we are placed in defence [sic] of our Country. every thing quiet here afew days ago our Pickets took nine prisoners one of them was a Lt. he was taken from his bed, and did not give him time to put on his pants, he was taken to our Camp and dressed in Confederate clothing which he thought was hard to have to wear such common clothing. So much for the yankee Lt, two of the prisoners were Sent to us to be guarded until arraignments could be made to Send them off, which was done last evening. give my Respects to friends generally. tell W. C. Buttler that I have not heard from him yet and would be glad to hear from him. What is John Owen at. I would like for him to come and see us. we would be very glad to see any of you come provided you could bring us a big Box of Provisions though I expect it is a busy time with you all. you should all plant heavy farmes [sic] be sure and plant enough for I am afraid Starvation will come upon us yet. do not let it be our fault. I see that Starvation is stairing [sic] us in the face. let us look well to our Resources and do the best we can. I have Sufferd [sic] and I am willing to Suffer more before I will ever give it up. independence is my motto                                           Your Bro.

O.P. White

[Note on top left corner:] I have not heard from Bro. Lal Since I left him write me whether any of you have heard from him

Modern Transcription:

Pocotaligo

Pocotaligo, S.C.

March 20, 1863

James White Jr.

Dear Bro, I received your Communication [and] also one from Father, [in] which I was highly gratified to learn that Bro. Murd. was improving [and] that all of Our families were in good health. As for myself, I have been very sick for four or five days. I am much better today; tomorrow I Shall Resume my business. I merely write this thinking that you all would hear of it and cause Father to be uneasy. So, I hope from the way that I feel now that I will be as hearty as ever, though this is a very Sickly Region of Country, and I hope we will not stay here long, but we must be contented whenever we are placed in defense of our Country. Everything quiet here. A few days ago our Pickets took nine prisoners. One of them was a [Lieutenant]: He was taken from his bed, and [they] did not give him time to put on his pants. He was taken to our Camp and dressed in Confederate clothing, which he thought [it] was hard to have to wear such common clothing. So much for the yankee Lt. Two of the prisoners were Sent to us to be guarded until arraignments could be made to Send them off, which was done last evening. Give my Respects to friends generally. Tell W. C. Buttler that I have not heard from him yet and would be glad to hear from him. [Where] is John Owen at? I would like for him to come and see us. We would be very glad to see any of you come, provided you could bring us a big Box of Provisions, though I expect it is a busy time with you all. You should all plant heavy farms. Be sure and plant enough, for I am afraid Starvation will come upon us yet. Do not let it be our fault. I see that Starvation is staring us in the face. Let us look well to our Resources and do the best we can. I have Suffered, and I am willing to Suffer more before I will ever give it up. Independence is my motto                                           Your Bro.

O. P. White

I have not heard from Bro. Lal Since I left him. Write me whether any of you have heard from him.

Editors Notes:

“O. P. White”: Oliver P. White wrote this letter and was one of the sons of James White and Martha Culbreth White. When the Civil War started, Oliver was a 37-year-old Sampson County farmer. He enlisted in the Confederate Army on March 10, 1862 as a First Lieutenant and served in Company I of the 46th North Carolina Infantry. Oliver surrendered with his regiment on April 9, 1865 at Appomattox Court House, Virginia. After the war, he married Elizabeth Draughon.

“James White Jr.”: James White Jr. (1829-1882) of Sampson County was one of the White brothers. In 1850, according to census records, he lived at home with his parents, James and Martha Culbreth White, and was an independent farmer by 1860. The 1860 Census listed him as the owner of real estate valued at $5,000, and personal property worth $15,000. James experienced financial loss after the war: In 1870, his real estate value went down to $1,000 and his personal property was valued at $400. James married Susan Royal, who was a schoolteacher.

“Farther”: James White Sr. (1792-1876) was the father of Lal, Oliver, James, and Murdock White. He owned property in Sampson County and was married to Martha Culbreth White.

“Bro. Murd”: (1822-1879) Murdock White was Oliver’s brother and a son of James and Martha White. He was a landowner & lived in Sampson County with his wife, Anne, and their children.

“Bro. Lal”: Lallister M. White, or “Lal”, was born in Sampson County, North Carolina. He was a son of James and Martha White and the brother of James Jr., Murdock, and Oliver. On April 20, 1861, when Lal was twenty-eight years old, he enlisted in the Confederate Army, serving in Company A, 30th Infantry North Carolina. On Sept. 3, 1863, he was promoted to First Lieutenant. On May 12, 1864, Lt. Lal White was killed at Spotsylvania Court House in Virginia.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This