SUBMITTED BY:  Michael Stroupe; transcribed by Cheri Todd Molter & Hallie Smith

Frederick Washington Dellinger, commonly called “Wash,” was born on Oct. 28, 1834, in the Cherryville area of Gaston County. His name was also spelled “Fredrick” and “Fred” in some records. Wash was the son of Frederick Lineberger Dellinger and Polly Dellinger. Wash grew up in a large family: Fred and Polly had eight children: They had three daughters—Barbara Caroline, Margaret Cynthia, and Fannie—and five sons—Wash, Daniel Conrad, Jacob Riley, Peter, and Henry. Wash and his four brothers all served in the Confederate Army.

On March 15, 1862, at Lincoln County, Wash enlisted in the Confederate Army for a term of “three years or for the duration of the war.” According to his compiled military record, Wash served in Company I of the 11th Infantry, North Carolina Troops. To learn more about Wash Dellinger’s war experiences, read “F. Washington Dellinger: The Confederate Veteran Who Said He was at Ford’s Theatre when President Abraham Lincoln was Shot.” (link here: https://nccivilwarcenter.org/f-washington-dellinger-the-confederate-veteran-who-said-he-was-at-fords-theatre-when-president-abraham-lincoln-was-shot/).

The following are transcriptions (one exact and one with modern punctuation and spelling) of the letter Wash’s father wrote to him on May 6, 1862. (Click on images to enlarge.)

Transcription of the original:

May the 6 1862

Dear Son I now seat my self with pen in hand to answer your affectionate letter which came to hand in dew time which was red with plesure we can inform you that we are all well and hopes threw the Mercies of God Those lines may find you in the same Comforts of life I havent much to wright to you at this time it has bin mighty wet since you left home

I can inform you that I got home safe and sound I am going to send you A Box again and I will just say that there are things for several men in it I send you som Brandy and each mans name is Branded on his jug Aso each ones name is on his one things so you will no his on things

Dear son if you get sick with the Mesels we want you to wright and let us no it

Als I am sending you one Bottle of whiskey for your one self when you wrigh let me no if you have got the Box so nothing more at present onley we Remain Yours till deth
F. L. Dillinger

To F. W. Dillinger

F, B, I want you to male the letters that you will see in your Box to Jacob R Dillinger and Daniel Dillinge[r] and send them on to them and oblige your Father
F. L. Dillinger

Transcription with modern spelling and punctuation:

May 6, 1862
Dear Son,
I now seat myself with pen in hand to answer your affectionate letter, which came to hand in due time, which was red with pleasure. We can inform you that we are all well and hope through the Mercies of God these lines may find you in the same Comforts of life. I haven’t much to write to you at this time. It has been mighty wet since you left home.

I can inform you that I got home safe and sound. I am going to send you A Box again, and I will just say that there are things for several men in it. I sent you some Brandy, and each man’s name is Branded on his jug. Also, each one’s name is on his own things so you will know his on things.

Dear son, if you get sick with the Measles, we want you to write, and let us know it.

Also, I am sending you one Bottle of whiskey for your own self. When you write, let me know if you have got the Box. So, nothing more at present. Only we Remain Yours ‘til death,
F. L. Dillinger

To F. W. Dillinger

F, B, I want you to mail the letters that you will see in your Box to Jacob R Dillinger and Daniel Dillinger, and send them on to them and oblige your Father.
F. L. Dillinger

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