SUBMITTED BY:  Sandra White Hinton (researched and written by Cheri Todd Molter; letter transcribed by Cheri Todd Molter & Caitlin Crenshaw)

Note from Sandra: Here are Lal’s letters. Please do upload them. His handwriting is so neat! All the Whites were educated, and they were all Masons, as well. (Click on letters to enlarge.)

Lallister M. White, or “Lal”, was born in Sampson County, North Carolina. He was a farmer before the Civil War started. On April 20, 1861, when Lal was twenty-eight years old, he enlisted in the Confederate Army, serving in Company A, 30th Infantry (North Carolina). On Sept. 3, 1863, he was promoted to First Lieutenant. On May 12, 1864, Lt. Lal White was killed at Spotsylvania Court House, Virginia.

Information about an individual mentioned in the letter:

Judson Hobbs was seventeen years old and a resident of Sampson County, North Carolina, when he joined the Confederate Army. On April 20, 1861, Hobbs enlisted into Company A, 30th Infantry (North Carolina) as a private. He was promoted to Sergeant (Full, Vol) on June 1, 1864. On Oct. 19, 1864, Hobbs was taken prisoner at Winchester, Virginia, and confined a few days later at Point Lookout, Maryland. There, Hobbs took the Oath of Allegiance on June 27, 1865, then was released afterward.

Transcription of original letter:

Army of Northern Virginia
Oct. 8th 1863
Murdock:
Dear brother: your letter of the 4th just came duly to hand on yesterday evening, finding me in remarkably good health. I am very glad to hear that you are all getting along in life very well and I hope that you may still be blessed amid surrounding troubles. I notice that your crop has suffered very much, by the accounts given in your letter. You further intimated that you desired to see me home on some business, but I am sorry to inform you that officers at present are not getting furloughs owing to the supposed advance of the enemy. So if the business is very urgent you will please address me by letter & probably, I can give you my views or opinion if it be anything that we can do by coraispondence [sic] it will be impossible for me to go home under three months or more.

I am very sorry indeed that you were all visited by a drouth in the month of August, I fear crops will be cut very short. Remember me to Ann and the Little Boys. Mr. Judson Hobbs desires to be remembered to Ann, and says tell her that he should have written to her long ago but owing to duties very binding, Judson is one of the sharp shooters of this Regiment it is a very important and responsible position and one that requires men of bravery. Judson has acted very gallantly so far in this war. Murd, I received a letter from father on day before yesterday he said he was unwell which I was very sorry indeed to hear but hope er’e this he is better. it makes me feel sad to hear news from home bringing intelligence of any sickness among my relatives & friends. but we are on lifes [sic] journey and are liable to be attacked with disease as well as by the enemy. Hence it becomes necessary for us to be prepared to meet any and all emergencies. Please go down and see father and write me if he is improving. He wrote me that he wanted me to get a furlough and come home, but alas; no man that is in good health need not try for a leave of absence from this army. Especially officers, as for private soldiers they still grant furloughs to them on urgent occasions. If Bro. Jas. has not got eight yards of that Blue grey cloth from Aunt Polly Howard for me, I hope that you will do me that favor, and keep it for me until I can be permitted to go home. Tell Frank, and Willie that I will come to see them So soon as I can.
I am dear brother
yours very respectfully
L.M. White

P.S. we are expecting a fight to come off every day. Though every thing [sic] is quick on the lines. I can see the yankees every day, yet we are not allowed to hold any communication with them. Giving best respect to Mr. Arthur Brown, also to T.N. Culbreth & Lady. Tell Tom & Mary that I have not heard from them since I left home. I suppose they are still living, yet they remain very silent. tell them I often think of them as in times gone by, but I expect they have entirely forgotten this absent
friend & relative
L.M.W.

Transcription with modern spelling and punctuation:

Army of Northern Virginia
Oct. 8, 1863
Murdock:
Dear brother: Your letter of the 4th just came duly to hand on yesterday evening, finding me in remarkably good health. I am very glad to hear that you are all getting along in life very well, and I hope that you may still be blessed amid surrounding troubles. I notice that your crop has suffered very much, by the accounts given in your letter. You further intimated that you desired to see me home on some business, but I am sorry to inform you that officers at present are not getting furloughs owing to the supposed advance of the enemy. So, if the business is very urgent, you will please address me by letter, & probably, I can give you my views or opinion if it be anything that we can do by correspondence. It will be impossible for me to go home under three months or more.

I am very sorry indeed that you were all visited by a drouth in the month of August. I fear crops will be cut very short. Remember me to Ann and the little boys. Mr. Judson Hobbs desires to be remembered to Ann, and says tell her that he should have written to her long ago, but [did not] owing to duties very binding, Judson is one of the sharp shooters of this Regiment; it is a very important and responsible position and one that requires men of bravery. Judson has acted very gallantly so far in this war. Murd, I received a letter from father on day before yesterday he said he was unwell, which I was very sorry indeed to hear but hope [before] this he is better. It makes me feel sad to hear news from home bringing intelligence of any sickness among my relatives & friends. But we are on life’s journey and are liable to be attacked with disease as well as by the enemy. Hence, it becomes necessary for us to be prepared to meet any and all emergencies. Please go down and see father and write me if he is improving. He wrote me that he wanted me to get a furlough and come home, but alas, no man that is in good health need…try for a leave of absence from this army, especially officers. As for private soldiers, they still grant furloughs to them on urgent occasions. If Brother James has not got eight yards of that Blue grey cloth from Aunt Polly Howard for me, I hope that you will do me that favor, and keep it for me until I can be permitted to go home. Tell Frank and Willie that I will come to see them so soon as I can.
I am dear brother
yours very respectfully,
L.M. White

P.S. We are expecting a fight to come off every day, though everything is quick on the lines. I can see the Yankees every day, yet we are not allowed to hold any communication with them. I Give my best respects to Mr. Arthur Brown, also to T.N. Culbreth & Lady. Tell Tom & Mary that I have not heard from them since I left home. I suppose they are still living, yet they remain very silent. Tell them I often think of them as in times gone by, but I expect they have entirely forgotten this absent
friend & relative,
L.M.W.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This