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Long Walk Awaited P.O.W.

Elihu Weaver, a resident of Ashe County and my great-great-grandfather, enlisted in the Confederate army on July 8, 1862. He was part of the 5th North Carolina Cavalry Battalion that was organized in Jacksboro, Tenn. in the fall of 1862. He was promoted to Corporal in...

Oldest son lost

Clay County was established in February 1861, mostly taken from Cherokee County. Because of the war, it wasn't fully organized until around 1868. But most of Company B, 7th Battalion, North Carolina Cavalry was made up of Clay County men and was commanded by Captain...

A Rough Knock on A Capitol Door

In the 1960's I would often go with my father, G. H. (Jerry) Elliott, then the Press Secretary to Governor Dan K. Moore, to his office in the Capitol in Raleigh. I would always stop to look at one of the first-floor doors which, along the bottom board, still bore the...

Wartime Letter Raises Question

My family left North Carolina for Alberta, Canada, in 1904, so little is known about my great-great-grandfather William Cheek's Confederate service. Born in Ashe County Apr. 14, 1844, he enlisted in Co. I, 61st North Carolina Infantry in Alleghany County in 1862. He...

Then It Became Civilized

Six days before his birthday Captain Ezra Lewis Moore, U.S. Army, was detailed to the staff of Joseph C. Abbott. As the battle for Fort Fisher was winding down, Capt. Moore and another officer were walking down towards the Mound Battery when they were approached by...

Brothers Separated by War

John McLaurin lived in Anson County. He was the son of Scottish immigrants Daniel and Nancy Ann (Stewart) McLaurin. John was a farmer. He never married. John joined 3rd Company G, 40th Regiment, North Carolina 3rd Artillery, in 1863 after his brother Daniel was...

Some Quiet Diplomacy at Elmira

Gideon Tyson, a private in the Confederate army, was captured at Fort Fisher. He was sent to the Elmira prison camp in New York, where a guard caught him stealing food in the kitchen area in the middle of the night. Gideon overpowered the guard with a knife, but did...

He Didn’t Lead from Behind

Col. Alonzo Alden enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1861 in the 169th New York Volunteers. He served in 29 battles and engagements during the Civil War. He was wounded at Edenton Road on April 24, 1863, at Cold Harbor on June 1, 1864, and at Fort Fisher on January 16,...

To War and Back

Thomas Hickman lived near Calabash in Brunswick County and enlisted in the Confederate army along with his neighbors and several relatives, including his brother, Henry. Lt. Hickman survived the Fort Fisher battle and imprisonment. He was paroled on March 5, 1865. He...

New Beginning at War’s End

Private Richard Dishman of Brooklyn, my great-grandfather, served in the U.S. Army with the 48th New York Infantry Regiment, Company B. He survived both the struggle for Fort Fisher and the Civil War. He was mustered out in Raleigh. He married Mary Walsh, and they had...

Capture Idled Young Officer

Confederate Lt. Joshua Soles was with the 2nd Co. A, 36th Regiment in North Carolina. Gen. Braxton Bragg sent Joshua to help defend Savannah during Sherman’s siege. Joshua returned to Fort Fisher after the evacuation of Savannah. He fought and was captured during the...

Family Put the War Behind Them

Malcolm McDonald Hall of Sampson County, my great-great-grandfather, was a private in the Confederate army. I do not have much information on him, but I know he was from Sampson County. He was born Malcolm McDonald, but after his father's death his mother married a...

Junior Reservist Made It Home

George Martin Glass, a 2nd lieutenant in the Confederate army, was a member of 4th Battalion, North Carolina Junior Reserves. He was stationed at Battery Buchanan for a time, finally surrendering in Greensboro. George farmed in Guilford County after the Civil War and...

Illness Sent New Yorker Home

Charles St. Andrews enlisted in the U.S. Army as a private in August 1862 and was a member of the 142nd New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment. His regimental commander was Colonel Newton Martin Curtis, who later won the Medal of Honor for his actions at the second...

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  • June 8 2020 Statement by the Board of Directors

    It is with great sadness for the families and friends of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor—and for where we are as a state and as a nation—that we at the North Carolina Civil War & Reconstruction History Center issue this statement. The unjust and violent ways that these …Read More »
  • North Carolina Civil War & Reconstruction History Center – Phase 1

    Always nice to share good news. Even in the throes of the virus, the History Center is pressing ahead with completion of Phase 1. Progress is great! We are still on course to have Phase 1 complete by the end of April. Stay tuned for the ribbon cutting and groundbreaking …Read More »
  • Public Hearings and Meetings

    The North Carolina Civil War & Reconstruction History Center is not something we just dreamed up last year and decided to build. In fact, we have held numerous public hearings and meetings with public officials, etc. Click the links below to download a list of the public hearings, as well as a …Read More »

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