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To War and Back

Thomas Hickman lived near Calabash in Brunswick County and enlisted in the Confederate army along with his neighbors and several relatives, including his brother, Henry. Lt. Hickman survived the Fort Fisher battle and imprisonment. He was paroled on March 5, 1865. He...

New Beginning at War’s End

Private Richard Dishman of Brooklyn, my great-grandfather, served in the U.S. Army with the 48th New York Infantry Regiment, Company B. He survived both the struggle for Fort Fisher and the Civil War. He was mustered out in Raleigh. He married Mary Walsh, and they had...

Capture Idled Young Officer

Confederate Lt. Joshua Soles was with the 2nd Co. A, 36th Regiment in North Carolina. Gen. Braxton Bragg sent Joshua to help defend Savannah during Sherman’s siege. Joshua returned to Fort Fisher after the evacuation of Savannah. He fought and was captured during the...

Family Put the War Behind Them

Malcolm McDonald Hall of Sampson County, my great-great-grandfather, was a private in the Confederate army. I do not have much information on him, but I know he was from Sampson County. He was born Malcolm McDonald, but after his father's death his mother married a...

Junior Reservist Made It Home

George Martin Glass, a 2nd lieutenant in the Confederate army, was a member of 4th Battalion, North Carolina Junior Reserves. He was stationed at Battery Buchanan for a time, finally surrendering in Greensboro. George farmed in Guilford County after the Civil War and...

Illness Sent New Yorker Home

Charles St. Andrews enlisted in the U.S. Army as a private in August 1862 and was a member of the 142nd New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment. His regimental commander was Colonel Newton Martin Curtis, who later won the Medal of Honor for his actions at the second...

My Civil War Ancestor

I had three ancestors in the Civil War. This is about one from Watauga county. Benjamin Moody was conscripted/drafted by the Southern side; but after he had been in a few months, he deserted and made his way over into Tennessee, where he joined the 13th Tennessee...

Waiting for the end in Sherman’s path

"The cloud of war is darkening and threatens to burst over our heads. Wilmington has fallen, Charleston and Columbia. Sherman is still making his onward march. Our own town is threatened and all is dismay and uncertainty." So wrote Jane Elliot from her plantation home...

Big Bob, The Slave Martyr

As a little African American girl, I grew up hearing stories about Big Bob, the slave martyr who gave his life for the U.S. Army and Captain Charles Lyons on a Union vessel off Rodman's Point near Washington, N.C., March 31, 1863. It was during the Siege of Washington...

Last of the Lot

The youngest of my great-grandfather Henry’s seven brothers wasn’t just one of the boys. At fifteen, he was the only boy. That should have been enough to keep him out of service to the Confederacy and, for almost all of the war, it did. But there...

Eight Is Enough

There are a couple of versions of this story in our family. My grandma's version was that there were "six sons, all over six feet tall, who went to war and all six came back." Grandma was never known for understatement, but she missed this one by two. There were, in...

Little Schoolhouse Wedding

My great-grandfather was Needham Outlaw of Duplin and Wayne counties. He was a private in Company I, 66th Regiment of North Carolina Troops. He served as a Confederate nurse and courier between eastern North Carolina and Richmond. It is unknown how much action he saw....

Stoneman’s Cavalry

My great-grandfather was a boy of 12 when Stoneman's cavalry raided through Western Lincoln County. As the cavalry approached, his mother loaded all the family's silverware and china into several burlap sacks, and they loaded the sacks onto their broken-down old mule....

Walking home from Richmond

My great-great-grandfather was Anthony Hohn, who came from Germany when he was seven years old. Enlisting in the Confederate army, he left his wife and two children to go to war. He was in many battles, but near the end of the war he reportedly shot someone and...

Sacrifice

Hardin Holyfield of Surry sent four sons to war. Hardin, the last of the four to join, was 14 years old. He served with the 28th N.C. infantry. He lived until 1930. My great-great grandfather, Hardin Sr., was a constable. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our...

Merit selection, it wasn’t

If you want to know how one of the nation's premiere military installations got its name, don't expect to find the answer in the Civil War service record of Braxton Bragg, who has been called "the North's favorite Southern general." Want To Work With Us? Get involved...

U.S. History, Meet the Present

There's no shortage of innocent assumptions, sneering one-liners, pseudohistory, off-topic diversions and mindless loops regarding the causes and conduct of the Civil War. If you've had enough of that cheap beer, then buy, borrow or check out Daniel A. Farber's...

High hopes and hard war

A Texas soldier stationed in Arkansas, one of eight Reb brothers born and reared on the same Cape Fear River plantation, was reservedly optimistic as the Civil War passed its first anniversary."If I am still blessed with good health," Jimmie Smith wrote his future...

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Latest News

  • North Carolina Civil War & Reconstruction History Center – Phase 1

    Always nice to share good news. Even in the throes of the virus, the History Center is pressing ahead with completion of Phase 1. Progress is great! We are still on course to have Phase 1 complete by the end of April. Stay tuned for the ribbon cutting and groundbreaking …Read More »
  • Public Hearings and Meetings

    The North Carolina Civil War & Reconstruction History Center is not something we just dreamed up last year and decided to build. In fact, we have held numerous public hearings and meetings with public officials, etc. Click the links below to download a list of the public hearings, as well as a …Read More »
  • Prominent African American Scholars and Academics Advising the History Center

    Prominent African American Scholars and Academics Advising the North Carolina Civil War & Reconstruction History Center: Dr. James Anderson, retired Chancellor and faculty, Fayetteville State University, member of our Board of Advisors Dr. Spencer Crew, former director of the Underground Railroad Museum, first African American director at the Smithsonian Museum …Read More »

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