Latest News

Coming Home Was Hard, Too

Private William Peoples, U.S. Army, served in Pennypacker's Brigade, in the Pennsylvania 203rd Regiment. He was from the part of Pennsylvania where Pennypacker lived. He survived both Fort Fisher and the war, but died at the age of 28 and appeared to have been in...

Junior Reserve Officer Saw Serious Action

Second Lieutenant George M. Glass served in the 4th Battalion, North Carolina Junior Reserves. He was stationed at Battery Buchanan, then went to Fort Holmes. He fought at Wise's Forks and then at Bentonville. He surrendered at Greensboro. After the war, George was a...

Long Walk Awaited P.O.W.

Elihu Weaver, a resident of Ashe County and my great-great-grandfather, enlisted in the Confederate army on July 8, 1862. He was part of the 5th North Carolina Cavalry Battalion that was organized in Jacksboro, Tenn. in the fall of 1862. He was promoted to Corporal in...

Persistence vs. Sherman’s Army

A story tells about General Sherman and his troops coming down Old Stage Road in Wake County through Willow Spring, to the Hugh Rias Blalock homeplace on what is now Highway 42 East. Sherman's men took mules, horses, wagons and other supplies. They ransacked the home,...

John C. Fann Family Lost Four Sons

John C. Fann and Bythenia Kelly married and raised a large family, including seven sons. Six of their sons were soldiers in the Civil War. Four of them did not come home. James, John, and Owen enlisted in June and August of 1861. They were in Company I, 20th North...

Oldest son lost

Clay County was established in February 1861, mostly taken from Cherokee County. Because of the war, it wasn't fully organized until around 1868. But most of Company B, 7th Battalion, North Carolina Cavalry was made up of Clay County men and was commanded by Captain...

A Rough Knock on A Capitol Door

In the 1960's I would often go with my father, G. H. (Jerry) Elliott, then the Press Secretary to Governor Dan K. Moore, to his office in the Capitol in Raleigh. I would always stop to look at one of the first-floor doors which, along the bottom board, still bore the...

Great-Great-Grandfather Found

About 1990, I visited my great-aunt, Elsie Foster. Since she was the oldest living relative, I asked her about our family. She told me that her grandfather died in the Civil War, and that she and a sister (Sylvania, who had moved to Raleigh) had visited the grave in...

Shot in the Head at Gettysburg

My great-grandfather, John Bowden Hood, joined the Confederate army in Sampson County on Sept. 9, 1861. He was sent to the coast defense at Fort Fisher. Later, he was transferred to Stonewall Jackson's brigade and became part of Jackson's famous "foot cavalry." As a...

Wartime Letter Raises Question

My family left North Carolina for Alberta, Canada, in 1904, so little is known about my great-great-grandfather William Cheek's Confederate service. Born in Ashe County Apr. 14, 1844, he enlisted in Co. I, 61st North Carolina Infantry in Alleghany County in 1862. He...

Close Calls for Cumberland Trooper

James Larkin Bedsole, of the Cedar Creek area in Cumberland County, was a private in the Confederate States Army, serving in the 36th North Carolina Regiment, 2nd company C. I have found his name on records that show him transported from Fayetteville to Wilmington by...

Pull to Service Runs Deep

William Bright Cole was born in Bentonville on the Cole plantation, the son of Willis Cole, who is buried on the farm. This farm is the site of the first day's fighting in the Battle of Bentonville, March 19, 1865. It includes the main line of the Army of Tennessee....

This Northerner Came To Fight

Corporal Samuel V. Mount, U.S. Army, served with the 112th New York Infantry. Wounded in battle at Richmond, he came back to fight in the first and second expeditions against Fort Fisher. He came in with sailors on the beach, under heavy fire, and died at the fort....

Man Knew How To Make a Point

Thomas Jefferson Bulla, my great-great-grandfather, had 200 men under his command when Union troops surrendered the U.S. Arsenal in Fayetteville to the state. The story that my grandfather told me when I was a child was that when Capt. Bulla and his men marched to...

Gesture of Peace Across the Years

Corporal James E. Reid, U.S. Army, was on picket duty along Wilmington Road and present at the magazine explosion, but did not participate in either assault at Fort Fisher or in the Wilmington Campaign. He wrote a series of more than 100 installments about his...

Soldier Gave Enough, or Had Enough

I got this information on James Salter Blount, my great-great-grandfather, through genealogy search. My family did not have any stories. James joined the Confederate army at age 19, mustering in in Beaufort County as a sergeant in the 36th Regiment, 2nd Company G. On...

Then It Became Civilized

Six days before his birthday Captain Ezra Lewis Moore, U.S. Army, was detailed to the staff of Joseph C. Abbott. As the battle for Fort Fisher was winding down, Capt. Moore and another officer were walking down towards the Mound Battery when they were approached by...

Brothers Separated by War

John McLaurin lived in Anson County. He was the son of Scottish immigrants Daniel and Nancy Ann (Stewart) McLaurin. John was a farmer. He never married. John joined 3rd Company G, 40th Regiment, North Carolina 3rd Artillery, in 1863 after his brother Daniel was...

Some Quiet Diplomacy at Elmira

Gideon Tyson, a private in the Confederate army, was captured at Fort Fisher. He was sent to the Elmira prison camp in New York, where a guard caught him stealing food in the kitchen area in the middle of the night. Gideon overpowered the guard with a knife, but did...

He Didn’t Lead from Behind

Col. Alonzo Alden enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1861 in the 169th New York Volunteers. He served in 29 battles and engagements during the Civil War. He was wounded at Edenton Road on April 24, 1863, at Cold Harbor on June 1, 1864, and at Fort Fisher on January 16,...

Civil War Veteran Held Civil Offices

Daniel James Clark was a captain in the Confederate States Army. He survived both the second battle for Fort Fisher and the war. After the war, he married Jemima Perry. They lived in Rosindale, in Bladen County, where he was a merchant and a farmer. Daniel was elected...

Confederate Prowled Carolina Coast

Jesse Wilson, a private in the Confederate army, was born May 26, 1831, in Pitt County. In 1856 Jesse married Margaret Ann Lay, with whom he had nine children. By 1860 he was a Brunswick County resident. From 1861‐1864, Jesse served in "Galloway’s Coast Guard," whose...

To War and Back

Thomas Hickman lived near Calabash in Brunswick County and enlisted in the Confederate army along with his neighbors and several relatives, including his brother, Henry. Lt. Hickman survived the Fort Fisher battle and imprisonment. He was paroled on March 5, 1865. He...

Still Plenty of Time To Die

Henry Hickman, who lived in the Calabash area in Brunswick County, enlisted in the Confederate army on February 19, 1862, five days after the fall of New Bern. The news of the attacks along the Outer Banks was thought to be the impetus for a large number of...

There’s No Refuge in Wartime

Lawrence L. Lancaster moved from Craven County to the Lockwood Folly region of Brunswick County, where he enlisted as a private with Company K, 36th Regiment North Carolina State Troops. Lawrence was captured defending Fort Fisher on January 15, 1865. While confined...

“Deserter” came back to fight

Moses Tyson was residing in Columbus County when he enlisted in the Confederate army on March 7, 1862. Shortly after he was assigned to Company E, 36th Regiment North Carolina State Troops (3rd N.C. Artillery), he was listed as having deserted from Fort Caswell. Moses...

Soldier Survived War and Smallpox

Solomon R. Ward, a private in the Confederate army, was sent to the Elmira prison camp in New York after the fall of Fort Fisher. He was exchanged on the James River in Virginia on March 14, 1865. Solomon was admitted to the USA Hospital Bermuda Hundred on March 21,...

Born To Fight, He Got His Wish

James Reilly, born in Ballydonagh, Ireland, on April 14, 1822, always had a passion to be a soldier. He attained the rank of major in the Confederate army. After the war, Reilly ran ferry boats in Wilmington. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our exciting...

Drummer Boy Turned His Hand to Farming

Neal Alexander Callihan of Bladen County was a Confederate drummer boy at 16. He served in 3rd Company B, 36 Regiment North Carolina Troops, and 2nd Regiment N.C. Artillery. After the war, Neal was a farmer. He lived to an old age. Want To Work With Us? Get involved...

New Beginning at War’s End

Private Richard Dishman of Brooklyn, my great-grandfather, served in the U.S. Army with the 48th New York Infantry Regiment, Company B. He survived both the struggle for Fort Fisher and the Civil War. He was mustered out in Raleigh. He married Mary Walsh, and they had...

Small Party Made a Big Haul

Private Kendrick Sunday Outlaw, Confederate army, was stationed at Fort Fisher with the North Carolina 2nd Light Artillery. He was captured on the Cape Fear River on June 25, 1864, by Lt. William B. Cushing, USN, and sent to Point Lookout, Md. as a prisoner of war....

New Yorker Came South To Fight

Florence Martin was born on May 15, 1836 in New York. His parents, Nicholas and Ava, had immigrated to the United States from France in the 1830s. Florence volunteered and enlisted in the U.S. Army as a private in August, 1862, in Rome N.Y. His regiment did war duty...

Capture Idled Young Officer

Confederate Lt. Joshua Soles was with the 2nd Co. A, 36th Regiment in North Carolina. Gen. Braxton Bragg sent Joshua to help defend Savannah during Sherman’s siege. Joshua returned to Fort Fisher after the evacuation of Savannah. He fought and was captured during the...

Family Put the War Behind Them

Malcolm McDonald Hall of Sampson County, my great-great-grandfather, was a private in the Confederate army. I do not have much information on him, but I know he was from Sampson County. He was born Malcolm McDonald, but after his father's death his mother married a...

Death Reached Far Beyond the Battlefield

Neill Stephen Kinlaw of Robeson County, a private in the Confederate army, survived the assault on Fort Fisher, but not the war. Captured at Fort Fisher, he was taken to the prison camp at Elmira, N.Y. He died one month later. He was 38 years old. Want To Work With...

Young General Distinguished Himself

Robert Frederick Hoke was born in Lincolnton, N.C., to Michael Hoke and Frances Burton on May 27, 1837. On Jan. 19, 1863, at the age of 26, he was promoted to brigadier general. (He later became a major general.) Robert was wounded at Chancellorsville and therefore...

Soldier Left Reminders of His War Years

Daniel J. Allen served the Confederacy in the 3rd Regiment, North Carolina Artillery. Pvt. Allen was captured on Jan. 15, 1865. He was sent to Elmira N.Y., was released, and signed the Oath of Allegiance on Aug. 7, 1865. We have in our possession this original...

Williamsons Risked All for the Confederacy

Four Williamson brothers, all in their early 20s, served in the 21st South Carolina Volunteers (Hagood’s Brigade), Co. L. Two of them, a first sergeant and a private, were killed at Fort Fisher during the second battle. The third brother, a private, was wounded and...

Smallpox Killed Elmira POW

James McKay Suggs was a private in the Confederate army, serving with the 36th North Carolina, Co. H. James died of smallpox while imprisoned at Elmira, N.Y. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our exciting project. [do_widget...

U.S. Seaman Wounded in Fisher Assault

Edward Hilton was born in 1827. As a U.S. Navy seaman, he was assigned to the USS Colorado during the second assault on Fort Fisher. He was wounded in the assault, then transferred to the USS New Hampshire, the USS Home, and the USS Vermont. He was discharged in...

Junior Reservist Made It Home

George Martin Glass, a 2nd lieutenant in the Confederate army, was a member of 4th Battalion, North Carolina Junior Reserves. He was stationed at Battery Buchanan for a time, finally surrendering in Greensboro. George farmed in Guilford County after the Civil War and...

Immigrant Served Twice in Wartime

John C. Koch, a corporal in the Confederate army, was born in 1842 in Wehldorf, a province of Hanover Germany. It is not known when John arrived in Wilmington, but he enlisted in Company A, 18th North Carolina Infantry, on April 15, 1861. He was mustered in as a...

Medal of Honor for Fort Fisher Action

Bruce Anderson of Fulton County, New York, was a member of the 142nd New York Infantry, Company K. That gave him the unusual distinction of being an African-American soldier serving in a white Civil War regiment. Having earned the Medal of Honor for his actions during...

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