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History Center’s 2018 Progress to Date

Our latest newsletter: History Center's 2018 Progress to Date! There's much to tell you! We're proud of the progress we've made in the first five months of 2018. Dear Friend of the History Center: There's much to tell you! We're proud of the progress we've made in the...

Groundbreaking Ceremony Speeches

Our Speakers From The North Carolina Civil War & Reconstruction History Center Groundbreaking Ceremony in Fayetteville, NC on April 18, 2018. Chancellor James A. Anderson The Honorable Patricia Timmons Goodson Senator Tony Rand Commissioner Michael C. Boose Mayor...

Uniting a divided history

From the robust public discussion about North Carolina’s legacy of Civil War monuments, it’s clear that — a century and a half after its close — we’re still sorting out how to make sense of that war…

Sherrod Family Celebrates Home of Patriarch, a Former Slave

Built as a wood structure in 1886, the entire building has been encapsulated into brick and has had multiple additions over the years, but Leonard Paul Sherrod Jr., great-grandson of the builder, knows what’s underneath.

Sherrod and other family members are preparing for a grand reunion on Sept. 1-3 to be held at the Sherrod homestead.

“We are refurnishing, repairing, remodeling when necessary and getting it ready to be used as a venue for the upcoming September reunion,” said Sherrod, who was born in Wilson in 1933 and graduated from Charles H. Darden High School in 1952.

A picnic and a banquet are planned at the event, which Sherrod has titled “Exploring Our Family History.”

“There is so much history,” Sherrod said. “Not only is it family history, it is African-American history, and in some small portion, American history.”

Grey Little Brown (1831-1907)

Before he enlisted in the Civil War, Grey Little Brown was a farmer and teacher in Edgecombe County. After the war, he returned to farming and teaching.

He became a “certified teacher” in 1871 as the state began to set standards (see copy of certificate).

His interest in education established the first school in Edgecombe County. He also sent three of his daughters to college in Greensboro, N.C. (the State Normal and Industrial School, aka Woman’s College aka UNCG).

Thomas Davis Rice

(Source: contributed by William D. Kenerly) Thomas Davis Rice was my great grandfather. He enlisted and was a private in the Civil War. After the War, he signed the Oath of Allegiance to the United States in Salisbury. He became a farmer and businessman in the...

A Tale of Two Men

Corporal John Campell Bass was an ancestor on my mother’s side. He joined the war effort in 1864. On March 16, 1865, he fought at Averasboro, North Carolina. A few days later, in the battle of Bentonville, he was killed. In March 1865, Private Troy Eldridge fought in...

Where did all the treason trials go?

Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason unless…

A summer of change, a long winter of resistance

As hopes and honeysuckle bloomed, a century and a half ago, forces were massing to ensure that the dreams of newly liberated slaves and their white supporters would never take root. At the federal level, slavery had been abolished by constitutional amendment. But...

Some Lived to Tell the Tale

(Source: Contributed by E.W. Smith) Of fifteen children who spent their childhood at the Harnett County house called Lebanon, eight soldier brothers served the Confederacy at one time or another while four surviving sisters did their best to keep track of them and...

Far From Home, at Home

(Source: Contributed by Gene Smith) “You would not feel at home tonight if you could step in and see our family circle so small, no one at home except Pa, Sarah, Janie, little Mary and myself,” Bettie Smith wistfully wrote to brother Curtis as spring stirred in 1864....

Our Latest Newsletter!

March 2017 Dear Friends, The North Carolina Civil War History Center has been making great progress! In this newsletter are some of our recent and upcoming activities. We thank you for your continued support and, as always, we encourage you to contact us if you have...

Captured at Deep Creek

Asaph Wilson Sherrill of Jackson County was a private in Thomas’ Legion. He was captured by Union soldiers at the Battle of Deep Creek. He was taken to Knoxville, Tennessee, then to Nashville, and finally, to a prison camp in Delaware. He died of dysentery and was...

A Glimpse into the Life of a Confederate Soldier Based on his Letters Home

Built as a wood structure in 1886, the entire building has been encapsulated into brick and has had multiple additions over the years, but Leonard Paul Sherrod Jr., great-grandson of the builder, knows what’s underneath.

Sherrod and other family members are preparing for a grand reunion on Sept. 1-3 to be held at the Sherrod homestead.

“We are refurnishing, repairing, remodeling when necessary and getting it ready to be used as a venue for the upcoming September reunion,” said Sherrod, who was born in Wilson in 1933 and graduated from Charles H. Darden High School in 1952.

A picnic and a banquet are planned at the event, which Sherrod has titled “Exploring Our Family History.”

“There is so much history,” Sherrod said. “Not only is it family history, it is African-American history, and in some small portion, American history.”

Lieutenant D. A. Black

Built as a wood structure in 1886, the entire building has been encapsulated into brick and has had multiple additions over the years, but Leonard Paul Sherrod Jr., great-grandson of the builder, knows what’s underneath.

Sherrod and other family members are preparing for a grand reunion on Sept. 1-3 to be held at the Sherrod homestead.

“We are refurnishing, repairing, remodeling when necessary and getting it ready to be used as a venue for the upcoming September reunion,” said Sherrod, who was born in Wilson in 1933 and graduated from Charles H. Darden High School in 1952.

A picnic and a banquet are planned at the event, which Sherrod has titled “Exploring Our Family History.”

“There is so much history,” Sherrod said. “Not only is it family history, it is African-American history, and in some small portion, American history.”

Reconstruction: the insurgency that followed the war

 This is the sesquicentennial of Reconstruction, an ugly but historically important period in which the Union, having won a long and ghastly Civil War, lost the peace to the same set of antagonists. That realization arrived in different places at different times....

One of the Yadkin Boys

George Washington Blakely was born in 1838 and, on June 18, 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate Army, serving in the group known as “Yadkin Boys,” Company F, 28th Regiment, NC Troops. He survived the War, but was wounded several times and lost part of one of his...

A Tale of Two Brothers

Lewis Osborn Sugg was born September 6, 1845 in Randolf County, and he was the son of Merritt A. Sugg and Tempy Spinks Sugg. The family story maintains that Lewis’s father, Merritt Sugg, left his home in eastern North Carolina and headed westward. He settled in the...

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