First Lieutenant Valentine Jackson Palmer, M.D., C.S.A.

by | Dec 8, 2017 | Confederate, Featured, Rutherford

Valentine Jackson Palmer, M.D., of Duncan Creek (Golden Valley), near Hollis, in Rutherford County, joined the Confederate States Army in 1862 as a first lieutenant of infantry. He was executive officer of Company F, 56th North Carolina Regiment, an infantry company. He chose to be with the men of the two counties from which Company F was drawn — Rutherford and Cleveland — and deferred a medical assignment. He remained the executive officer of Company F throughout the war until his capture at the Battle of Five Forks, Virginia, on April 1, 1865. Lieutenant (Doctor) Valentine Jackson Palmer’s major military engagements included: The Virginia Peninsular Campaign, starting at Williamsburg (Fort Magruder) and Drewry’s Bluff (Fort Darling] in May of 1862, and the Battle of Chickahominy (first Battle of Cold Harbor, or the Battle of Gaines’ Mill – third of the “Seven Days Battles”), on June 27 1862; picket duty 1863. At the Battle of Plymouth in Washington County, northeast North Carolina (April 17-20, 1864), he “was seriously wounded by having back of thigh cut with piece of shell.” But he was present for the siege of Petersburg, including the “Battle of the Crater” (July 30, 1864); the Battle of Ream’s Station (August 25, 1864); the Battle of Fort Stedman (Hare’s Hill), Petersburg (March 25 1865); and the Battle of Five Forks (Dinwiddie Court House), southwest of Petersburg, at which he was captured on April 1, 1865 with four rifle loaders. He was imprisoned at Johnson’s Island in Lake Erie, Ohio. He was “Released on Oath” under General Order 109, Register No. 2, Page 123, Johnson’s Island, Ohio, and released on June 19, 1865. Lieutenant Valentine Jackson Palmer’s unit, Company F, 56th North Carolina Regiment, was present at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865, at the surrender on General Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia.

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