Our State – Our Stories

Prison Claimed Another Fort Fisher Veteran

Private Henry Anderson, Confederate States Army, served in Company D, 40th Regiment, 3rd NC Artillery. He was captured at Fort Fisher and taken to the prison at Elmira, N.Y. Henry was released July 19, 1865, but died that year due to his poor treatment while at...

Born To Fight, He Got His Wish

James Reilly, born in Ballydonagh, Ireland, on April 14, 1822, always had a passion to be a soldier. He attained the rank of major in the Confederate army. After the war, Reilly ran ferry boats in Wilmington. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our exciting...

Private Survived War and Elmira

Daniel James Allen, a private in the Confederate Army, enlisted at 18 years of age. He was captured at Fort Fisher on January 15, 1865. He was confined at Elmira, N.Y. and was released after taking the Oath of Allegiance on August 7, 1865. Want To Work With Us? Get...

From Soldiering to Farming

Samuel Jenkins Taylor enlisted in the Confederate army as a private at the age of 38. He survived Fort Fisher, and farmed after the war. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our exciting project. Phone:...

Down But Not Out at Fort Fisher

Private Charles Montgomery Grimsley, Confederate States Army, was wounded at Fort Fisher December 24‐25, 1864, but survived the war. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our exciting project. Phone: 910-491-0602...

Drummer Boy Turned His Hand to Farming

Neal Alexander Callihan of Bladen County was a Confederate drummer boy at 16. He served in 3rd Company B, 36 Regiment North Carolina Troops, and 2nd Regiment N.C. Artillery. After the war, Neal was a farmer. He lived to an old age. Want To Work With Us? Get involved...

New Beginning at War’s End

Private Richard Dishman of Brooklyn, my great-grandfather, served in the U.S. Army with the 48th New York Infantry Regiment, Company B. He survived both the struggle for Fort Fisher and the Civil War. He was mustered out in Raleigh. He married Mary Walsh, and they had...

Small Party Made a Big Haul

Private Kendrick Sunday Outlaw, Confederate army, was stationed at Fort Fisher with the North Carolina 2nd Light Artillery. He was captured on the Cape Fear River on June 25, 1864, by Lt. William B. Cushing, USN, and sent to Point Lookout, Md. as a prisoner of war....

Fort Fisher to Bladen — the Long Way Around

Wright Singletary, my great-grandfather, entered Confederate service as a private at the age of 30, and served as a cook at Fort Fisher. During the battle on January 15, 1865, he took some dramatic action with hot water when Union troops entered the fort. Wright was...

New Yorker Came South To Fight

Florence Martin was born on May 15, 1836 in New York. His parents, Nicholas and Ava, had immigrated to the United States from France in the 1830s. Florence volunteered and enlisted in the U.S. Army as a private in August, 1862, in Rome N.Y. His regiment did war duty...

Capture Idled Young Officer

Confederate Lt. Joshua Soles was with the 2nd Co. A, 36th Regiment in North Carolina. Gen. Braxton Bragg sent Joshua to help defend Savannah during Sherman’s siege. Joshua returned to Fort Fisher after the evacuation of Savannah. He fought and was captured during the...

Family Put the War Behind Them

Malcolm McDonald Hall of Sampson County, my great-great-grandfather, was a private in the Confederate army. I do not have much information on him, but I know he was from Sampson County. He was born Malcolm McDonald, but after his father's death his mother married a...

Death Reached Far Beyond the Battlefield

Neill Stephen Kinlaw of Robeson County, a private in the Confederate army, survived the assault on Fort Fisher, but not the war. Captured at Fort Fisher, he was taken to the prison camp at Elmira, N.Y. He died one month later. He was 38 years old. Want To Work With...

Young General Distinguished Himself

Robert Frederick Hoke was born in Lincolnton, N.C., to Michael Hoke and Frances Burton on May 27, 1837. On Jan. 19, 1863, at the age of 26, he was promoted to brigadier general. (He later became a major general.) Robert was wounded at Chancellorsville and therefore...

Cost of Fort Fisher Kept rising

Gary Spencer of New Hanover County, a Confederate private, lost his life in the struggle for Fort Fisher and control of the North Carolina coast. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our exciting project. Phone:...

Young Life Cut Short by War, Illness

George F. Flowers, Confederate, joined the 2nd North Carolina Light Artillery, Co. G, at age 17. He was captured on the Cape Fear River on June 25, 1864, and was sent to Fort Monroe, Va., then to Point Lookout Military Prison Camp in Maryland, where he died at age 18...

Tar Heel Soldier Died at Infamous New York Prison

Robert Ottaway enlisted in the Confederate army as a private at age 17, serving with 2nd North Carolina Light Artillery, Co. G. He was captured at Fort Fisher and was sent to the Elmira prison camp in New York. He died there of disease on May 5, 1865. Robert is buried...

Soldier Left Reminders of His War Years

Daniel J. Allen served the Confederacy in the 3rd Regiment, North Carolina Artillery. Pvt. Allen was captured on Jan. 15, 1865. He was sent to Elmira N.Y., was released, and signed the Oath of Allegiance on Aug. 7, 1865. We have in our possession this original...

Williamsons Risked All for the Confederacy

Four Williamson brothers, all in their early 20s, served in the 21st South Carolina Volunteers (Hagood’s Brigade), Co. L. Two of them, a first sergeant and a private, were killed at Fort Fisher during the second battle. The third brother, a private, was wounded and...

Smallpox Killed Elmira POW

James McKay Suggs was a private in the Confederate army, serving with the 36th North Carolina, Co. H. James died of smallpox while imprisoned at Elmira, N.Y. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our exciting project. [do_widget...

U.S. Seaman Wounded in Fisher Assault

Edward Hilton was born in 1827. As a U.S. Navy seaman, he was assigned to the USS Colorado during the second assault on Fort Fisher. He was wounded in the assault, then transferred to the USS New Hampshire, the USS Home, and the USS Vermont. He was discharged in...

Junior Reservist Made It Home

George Martin Glass, a 2nd lieutenant in the Confederate army, was a member of 4th Battalion, North Carolina Junior Reserves. He was stationed at Battery Buchanan for a time, finally surrendering in Greensboro. George farmed in Guilford County after the Civil War and...

Immigrant Served Twice in Wartime

John C. Koch, a corporal in the Confederate army, was born in 1842 in Wehldorf, a province of Hanover Germany. It is not known when John arrived in Wilmington, but he enlisted in Company A, 18th North Carolina Infantry, on April 15, 1861. He was mustered in as a...

Medal of Honor for Fort Fisher Action

Bruce Anderson of Fulton County, New York, was a member of the 142nd New York Infantry, Company K. That gave him the unusual distinction of being an African-American soldier serving in a white Civil War regiment. Having earned the Medal of Honor for his actions during...

Illness Sent New Yorker Home

Charles St. Andrews enlisted in the U.S. Army as a private in August 1862 and was a member of the 142nd New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment. His regimental commander was Colonel Newton Martin Curtis, who later won the Medal of Honor for his actions at the second...

The Biggest Killer Wasn’t Battle

Absalom Tuten Roe enlisted in the Confederate army in Beaufort County on January 25, 1862. Private Roe was involved in the construction of Fort Fisher. He arrived there on March 29 1862, with Co. B of the 40th Regiment, North Carolina Troops, 3rd North Carolina...

My Civil War Ancestor

I had three ancestors in the Civil War. This is about one from Watauga county. Benjamin Moody was conscripted/drafted by the Southern side; but after he had been in a few months, he deserted and made his way over into Tennessee, where he joined the 13th Tennessee...

Illness Ended the War for a Young Artilleryman

George F. Flowers, Private, CSA, joined the 2nd North Carolina Light Artillery, Co. G, at age 17. George was captured on the Cape Fear River on June 25, 1864, and sent to Fort Monroe, Va. He was then sent to the Point Lookout Military Prison Camp in Maryland, where he...

Reassignment spared unit from the

Jacob H. Idol (Eitel) was a private in the Confederate army. At some point, Co. A, 42nd North Carolina Infantry, were guards at the Salisbury prisoner of war camp. Some soldiers voted to go to the “Eastern Theatre” Army of Northern VA and saw action at Cold Harbor...

Artilleryman Had a Long Walk Home

Joseph Haywood Chason, from Lumber Bridge, N.C., volunteered to join the Confederacy for a three-year enlistment in February 1862. He was assigned to Fort Fisher the entire time as an artilleryman, with the rank of private. Joseph was present for the epic battle when...

New Yorker Wounded Far from Home

By: Sharon Butterfield Urgento, Dennis Urgento Charles Larkin enlisted in the U.S. Army as a private in September 1862 at Sand Lake, N.Y., at age 22. Charles served in the 169th Regiment, Co. H. A Samuel Larkin, quite likely his brother or cousin, served with him in...

Pennsylvania POW, Battle of Plymouth

In his early thirties, Martin Lybarger went to war in the 101st Pennsylvania Veterans Volunteer Infantry, leaving behind a wife and small son. He was among the Union troops captured at the Battle of Plymouth in April of 1864 and walked miles to cattle cars that...

The Bowens of Bertie heed the call

Frederick Columbus Bowen, born March 6, 1840, was the fourth child, third son, of Jesse and Margaret Bowen. He was born in Bertie County, North Carolina and lived at home with his parents where he learned to farm. He was also taught to read and write. After the Civil...

Waiting for the end in Sherman’s path

"The cloud of war is darkening and threatens to burst over our heads. Wilmington has fallen, Charleston and Columbia. Sherman is still making his onward march. Our own town is threatened and all is dismay and uncertainty." So wrote Jane Elliot from her plantation home...

A different kind of marriage

Great-Great-Granddaddy Frank Civils grew up in the Core Creek area near Asbury and had fallen in love with Mary Jane Riggs. When they decided to get married, their parents refused to allow it. Frank then married Elizabeth Daugherty on February 22, 1850, and Mary Jane...

A Civil War Christmas Story

On Christmas Day in 1862, the African American population of Washington, North Carolina organized a Christmas dinner for the Union soldiers and sailors who were stationed in Washington. The dinner was held at unoccupied store in downtown Washington and the tables were...

Big Bob, The Slave Martyr

As a little African American girl, I grew up hearing stories about Big Bob, the slave martyr who gave his life for the U.S. Army and Captain Charles Lyons on a Union vessel off Rodman's Point near Washington, N.C., March 31, 1863. It was during the Siege of Washington...

Last of the Lot

The youngest of my great-grandfather Henry’s seven brothers wasn’t just one of the boys. At fifteen, he was the only boy. That should have been enough to keep him out of service to the Confederacy and, for almost all of the war, it did. But there was a problem. By the...

Eight Is Enough

There are a couple of versions of this story in our family. My grandma's version was that there were "six sons, all over six feet tall, who went to war and all six came back." Grandma was never known for understatement, but she missed this one by two. There were, in...

Ancestor literally held the fort

I was a resident of Harnett County during my U.S. Army service at Fort Bragg, NC. I now reside in Florence County, S.C. I am a Civil War reenactor and may be found on Facebook at Frank Slemmer. An interesting note is that the first recorded ancestor, Frank Schlemmer,...

Little Schoolhouse Wedding

My great-grandfather was Needham Outlaw of Duplin and Wayne counties. He was a private in Company I, 66th Regiment of North Carolina Troops. He served as a Confederate nurse and courier between eastern North Carolina and Richmond. It is unknown how much action he saw....

Three Young Brothers of Franklin County

John Young, Jr (for whom Youngsville, N.C. was named) had three sons who served in the Civil War. Thomas Jefferson Young enlisted on Sept. 5, 1862 in Wayne County (his residence was Wake County) as a Private, age 20. He served in Co. I, 1st North Carolina Infantry. He...

Three Days in Maryland, 1862

Captain Chalmers Lanier Glenn of Rockingham County served in Company I, Third North Carolina Regiment. (William Dorsey Pender was his 1st Colonel.) Glenn was killed in the bloodbath at South Mountain on Sept. 14, 1862. Brigadier General Lawrence O'Bryan Branch of...

Horseshoes in the Belfry

During the Civil War, Kinstonians began seeking places to hide their valuables. When Rev. JB Webb, the minister of the town's local Methodist Church and owner of a local factory manufacturing goods for the Confederacy, heard that the Yankees were coming, he had...

Love in the Midst of War

Lieutenant D.A. Black was one of the "Carolina Boys" of Company K, 38th Regiment of the North Carolina Troops, under the command of Captain M. McR. McLauchlin. On May 3, 1862, Lieutenant D.A. Black wrote to a friend in North Carolina from his camp at Milford Station...

Stoneman’s Cavalry

My great-grandfather was a boy of 12 when Stoneman's cavalry raided through Western Lincoln County. As the cavalry approached, his mother loaded all the family's silverware and china into several burlap sacks, and they loaded the sacks onto their broken-down old mule....

Walking home from Richmond

My great-great-grandfather was Anthony Hohn, who came from Germany when he was seven years old. Enlisting in the Confederate army, he left his wife and two children to go to war. He was in many battles, but near the end of the war he reportedly shot someone and...

Sacrifice

Hardin Holyfield of Surry sent four sons to war. Hardin, the last of the four to join, was 14 years old. He served with the 28th N.C. infantry. He lived until 1930. My great-great grandfather, Hardin Sr., was a constable. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our...

Merit selection, it wasn’t

If you want to know how one of the nation's premiere military installations got its name, don't expect to find the answer in the Civil War service record of Braxton Bragg, who has been called "the North's favorite Southern general." Want To Work With Us? Get involved...

U.S. History, Meet the Present

There's no shortage of innocent assumptions, sneering one-liners, pseudohistory, off-topic diversions and mindless loops regarding the causes and conduct of the Civil War. If you've had enough of that cheap beer, then buy, borrow or check out Daniel A. Farber's...

High hopes and hard war

A Texas soldier stationed in Arkansas, one of eight Reb brothers born and reared on the same Cape Fear River plantation, was reservedly optimistic as the Civil War passed its first anniversary."If I am still blessed with good health," Jimmie Smith wrote his future...

Become a Charter Member of the Friends of the History Center!

On Thursday, May 8, from 7:30 – 9:30 PM, the History Center will launch its Friends program at a special gathering at SkyView on Hay in downtown Fayetteville.  We will be premiering a special video about the History Center plans and we will be hearing from one of the...

Community Foundation Announces $500,000 Grant Investment

Leaders of Cumberland Community Foundation announced a major gift to the proposed North Carolina Civil War History Center. Plans call for the education center to be built on the grounds of the existing State-supported Museum of the Cape Fear, directly adjacent to the...

There’s no script for war

Abolish the unthinkable and you can have no more wars. Is there even a remote chance that Alexander McRae, a U.S. Army officer from Fayetteville, idly wondered during his time as a West Point cadet if he would die in New Mexico Territory battling rebels led by his...

Page 4 of 41234

The N.C. Civil War History Center Blog

Browse By County

Latest News

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This