Our State – Our Stories

Jacob Dixon was True Blue

Jacob Dixon was born near Snow Camp (now Alamance County) December 15, 1842. The son of Quakers Caleb and Mary Snotherly Dixon, he was opposed to the war, as were all members of the Society of Friends. The family story passed down from generation to generation was...

Confederate Veteran and Jack of Many Trades

Drury Alston Putnam, my great-great-grandfather, was born Dec. 23, 1830, in Cleveland county, North Carolina, to Roberts Putnam and Lucinda Weaver. He was a “jack of many trades.” The various censuses from 1850 until 1910 show him as a wagon maker, farmer, artist and...

Serving with the 22nd North Carolina

A.J. Dula, of Caldwell County, shared in almost all of the Army of Northern Virginia's travails during the Civil War. After joining the 22nd North Carolina Regiment in Caldwell County in April of 1861, he served in almost all the battles of the Eastern theater. Dula...

David Oliver of Belgrade enlisted July 1, 1861

David Oliver was born in Onslow County where he resided as a farmer. He enlisted on July 1, 1861 at age 21. He was killed in Sharpsburg, Maryland, on September 17, 1862. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our exciting project. [do_widget...

John Humphrey enlisted at age 14

My great-grandfather joined the Confederate States Army in June, 1861. He was assigned to the 10th Heavy Artillery at Fort Lane in New Bern. It was noted in family lore that when he enlisted he was only 14 years old. To get around his age, he wrote "18" on a slip of...

Louisburg resident nursed an ill Union soldier until his death

Union General William T. Sherman met with Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston on April 26, 1865 at Bennett Place near what is now Durham, N.C., and Johnston surrendered his Army of Tennessee. At this time, Gen. Sherman headed back to Washington, D.C. His troops,...

William Moses Loftin walked home after the War

William Moses Loftin was at the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia. He shook the hand of Gen. Robert E. Lee. His parole paper is still in our family. He walked home from the war. He was a county commissioner in 1868. His ancestor Col. William Loftin was a...

Pvt. William Townsend of Robeson County

William Townsend was born in 1842 in Robeson County. He was 6 feet, six inches tall and a private in the 18th North Carolina Regiment, 8th Volunteers, Branch and Lane Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. After the war he farmed, and lived to age 86 in the town of St....

50-year-old soldier served with three of his sons

John Duckworth Morrison (1813-1892) was my great-great-great-grandfather. He married Fannie Epley (1813-1914) and they had eight children, all born before the beginning of the Civil War and his enlistment. He had four sons who fought for the Confederacy. Three served...

Iredell Cavalry Officer Saw Action

My great-great-grandfather, Hugh Caldwell Bennett (14 Dec. 1832 - 3 March 1907), was the son of George Stepto Bennett and Elizabeth Newland Bennett of Iredell County, N.C. He enlisted in Company F, North Carolina 3rd Cavalry Regiment as a corporal on 07 Oct. 1861 and...

Ancestor served, but had little to say

"My great-grandfather was named William Cahoon, but my grams called him Bill. He served in the Confederacy but my dad said he never heard him talk about it. My great-grandmother did receive money for a while after the war, and that helped them keep up part of the...

gun found on Hatteras

I once knew a man who had a gun he swore was found on the beaches of Hatteras, washed up after the Yankees came through the inlet. I never knew if he was pulling my leg, but he was proud of his gun! Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our exciting project....

A Novelist’s ties to Hyde County

Taken from stories written by William Stryon: "I've always been surprised by my direct link to the Old South -- the South of slavery and the Civil War. Many southerners of my vintage, and even some of those who are considerably older, can claim an ancestral connection...

Romance Kindled During Union Occupation of Fayetteville

As characteristic of the military presence in the Fayetteville area throughout the years, soldier boys met, fell in love with, and married local girls. This was true not only in the case of my parents, but also in my family's history. It was not long after General...

Grandmother’s locket

There are no records of when my grandmother was born, but her father was away fighting for the Confederacy. When he received news of her birth, he used that month's payment to buy a locket inscribed with the date 1864. That was the only record of her birth, and she...

A Deserter’s Story

George Deans (1831-1839), a Wayne County farmer, was a loyal Union man and bitterly opposed to the war between the states. In May 1862 he was conscripted by the Confederate army and taken from his home by about 15 armed men and sent to Richmond, Virginia. He was...

Tried to hide his son from the Draft Board

Daniel Christenberry Kirk, my great-great-great-grandfather, was a farmer on Morrow Mountain along the Pee Dee River. When the war broke out, Daniel's two oldest sons, James and George, enlisted in the Confederate Army. Daniel was sick and crippled. We don't know the...

The Soldier’s Choice

A Confederate soldier is given an assignment to lie in wait for a Union courier who is carrying important papers. The Confederate is, "at all costs," to bring those documents back with him. The Union courier is singing a beloved hymn as he unknowingly approaches the...

Confederate POW Died on Johnson’s Island

Levi Branson Williams, was the son of Ezekiel Randolph and Agnes Williams, of Guilford County. Born on November 13th, 1837, at an early age, he was left an orphan and in the care of his grandfather, Nathan Williams, passed the happy days of childhood. Of an earnest...

Family stories of the Underground Railroad

Excerpted from "Ramblings of a Country Boy," by Stephen Arthur Cohagan (my grandfather), written 1953. (Private papers) "Grandfather (John Pugh Jay) and Grandmother (Rachel Commons Jay) maintained a station in 'the Underground Railroad' and back of the fruit bins in...

Killing Yankees in the Hog Pen

My great-great-grandfather, James B. Vause, served with the "Lenoir Braves." He was captured at Hatteras Island and held as a prisoner of war at Fort Warren, Massachusetts, until his release in a prisoner exchange in 1862. His brother, Robert B. Vause, was killed at...

Jacob Wagner’s Civil War

Jacob Wagner, my great-great-grandfather, was a member of Wiedrich's New York Light Artillery from Buffalo, NY. He came alone from Germany at age 16 and joined the battery on his 21st birthday. His first battle was Gettysburg, where he fought the three days on...

Wounded at Appomattox

John Murphy Walton, son of Col. Thomas George Walton and Eliza Murphy Walton, was born at the family home "Creekside" in Morganton in 1844. When war was declared in 1861, he left military training at Hillsborough Academy at age 16 to enlist in the 6th Regiment, North...

Confederates stalking Confederates

A good shake of the family tree often brings down a hail of Civil War soldiers, each good for at least one war story pieced together from unit records or one personal anecdote preserved in a letter or diary entry. But what did it mean to belong, as did several of my...

Confederate veteran testifies to help Unionist neighbors

My great-great-grandfather, Samuel Bowman, was a farmer from Burke County. On October 7, 1861, he joined Captain Thomas G. Walton’s company of volunteers, the Davis Dragoons, a cavalry unit which would eventually become Company F of the 41st Regiment North Carolina...

Ivey Lee’s Encounter with Yankee Bummers

Mr. Ivey Lee's Encounter With Yankee Bummers The time was the day before the last major battle of the War of Northern Aggression, the "Battle of Bentonville". Major General William Tecumseh Sherman's Bummers inflicted not only property damage to one Southern Farmer...

The South before the war: an island in time

The first thing a modern time-traveler would notice, on arrival in the antebellum South, would most likely be the silence. There might be movement among dry leaves, or the snort of a horse. Bird songs, surely, and, somewhere, a barking dog. But no dense overlay of...

Special Private Tour of Chancellorsville Battleground

Come join us on August 15.     Click here for Tour Details! Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our exciting project. Phone: 910-491-0602 Email: info@nccivilwarcenter.org 824 Branson Street Post Office Box 53865...

Henry Groner paid dearly for his service

Henry Lafayette Groner, my great-great-grandfather, enlisted for the Civil War on March 13, 1862 in the 20th North Carolina Infantry, Cabarrus Guards, at age 22. He was wounded in the left leg and captured at Fox's Gap, South Mountain, Maryland, on or about September...

Virginian served on land and sea

Clarence Cary, Confederate States Navy, was born in March of 1845, the son of Archibald Cary and Monimia Fairfax Cary, grandson of Thomas Fairfax, ninth Lord Fairfax of Cameron. He was a direct descendant of Pocahontas and John Rolfe and the Plantagenets of England....

Disease, Not Lead, Found This Trooper

Joseph W. Boys was a private in the United States Army, serving with the 112th New York. (A regimental history written by a chaplain with the 112th can be found online.) Joseph, a mortician, survived the action at Fort Fisher but was physically disabled by lung...

Coming Home Was Hard, Too

Private William Peoples, U.S. Army, served in Pennypacker's Brigade, in the Pennsylvania 203rd Regiment. He was from the part of Pennsylvania where Pennypacker lived. He survived both Fort Fisher and the war, but died at the age of 28 and appeared to have been in...

Junior Reserve Officer Saw Serious Action

Second Lieutenant George M. Glass served in the 4th Battalion, North Carolina Junior Reserves. He was stationed at Battery Buchanan, then went to Fort Holmes. He fought at Wise's Forks and then at Bentonville. He surrendered at Greensboro. After the war, George was a...

Long Walk Awaited P.O.W.

Elihu Weaver, a resident of Ashe County and my great-great-grandfather, enlisted in the Confederate army on July 8, 1862. He was part of the 5th North Carolina Cavalry Battalion that was organized in Jacksboro, Tenn. in the fall of 1862. He was promoted to Corporal in...

Persistence vs. Sherman’s Army

A story tells about General Sherman and his troops coming down Old Stage Road in Wake County through Willow Spring, to the Hugh Rias Blalock homeplace on what is now Highway 42 East. Sherman's men took mules, horses, wagons and other supplies. They ransacked the home,...

John C. Fann Family Lost Four Sons

John C. Fann and Bythenia Kelly married and raised a large family, including seven sons. Six of their sons were soldiers in the Civil War. Four of them did not come home. James, John, and Owen enlisted in June and August of 1861. They were in Company I, 20th North...

Oldest son lost

Clay County was established in February 1861, mostly taken from Cherokee County. Because of the war, it wasn't fully organized until around 1868. But most of Company B, 7th Battalion, North Carolina Cavalry was made up of Clay County men and was commanded by Captain...

A Rough Knock on A Capitol Door

In the 1960's I would often go with my father, G. H. (Jerry) Elliott, then the Press Secretary to Governor Dan K. Moore, to his office in the Capitol in Raleigh. I would always stop to look at one of the first-floor doors which, along the bottom board, still bore the...

Great-Great-Grandfather Found

About 1990, I visited my great-aunt, Elsie Foster. Since she was the oldest living relative, I asked her about our family. She told me that her grandfather died in the Civil War, and that she and a sister (Sylvania, who had moved to Raleigh) had visited the grave in...

Shot in the Head at Gettysburg

My great-grandfather, John Bowden Hood, joined the Confederate army in Sampson County on Sept. 9, 1861. He was sent to the coast defense at Fort Fisher. Later, he was transferred to Stonewall Jackson's brigade and became part of Jackson's famous "foot cavalry." As a...

Wartime Letter Raises Question

My family left North Carolina for Alberta, Canada, in 1904, so little is known about my great-great-grandfather William Cheek's Confederate service. Born in Ashe County Apr. 14, 1844, he enlisted in Co. I, 61st North Carolina Infantry in Alleghany County in 1862. He...

Close Calls for Cumberland Trooper

James Larkin Bedsole, of the Cedar Creek area in Cumberland County, was a private in the Confederate States Army, serving in the 36th North Carolina Regiment, 2nd company C. I have found his name on records that show him transported from Fayetteville to Wilmington by...

Pull to Service Runs Deep

William Bright Cole was born in Bentonville on the Cole plantation, the son of Willis Cole, who is buried on the farm. This farm is the site of the first day's fighting in the Battle of Bentonville, March 19, 1865. It includes the main line of the Army of Tennessee....

This Northerner Came To Fight

Corporal Samuel V. Mount, U.S. Army, served with the 112th New York Infantry. Wounded in battle at Richmond, he came back to fight in the first and second expeditions against Fort Fisher. He came in with sailors on the beach, under heavy fire, and died at the fort....

Thomas Jefferson Pitchford Jr. — 12th NC Troops

T.J. (as he was known) was one of six sons of Dr. Thomas Jefferson Pitchford (North Carolina state legislator during the Civil War). All six sons served in the Confederacy: three in the 12th N.C. Troops, two in the Mississippi Light Artillery and the youngest in the...

Great-Grandfather was soldier, POW

Richard Smith, my great-grandfather, was born in Bladen County in December of 1833. His family were among the earliest settlers in North Carolina in the early 1700s. He enlisted in the Confederate army in Bladen County on Oct. 19, 1861 as a private in Co. I, 2nd...

Back to the Farm – the Hard Way

John Foster Landreth, my great-great-great-grandfather, was born Jan. 18, 1826 in Stokes County. He was the eldest documented son of Obadiah Landreth and Mahalia Branson Landreth. Like his father, he was a farmer. His family did not own slaves. John married Eleanor...

Man Knew How To Make a Point

Thomas Jefferson Bulla, my great-great-grandfather, had 200 men under his command when Union troops surrendered the U.S. Arsenal in Fayetteville to the state. The story that my grandfather told me when I was a child was that when Capt. Bulla and his men marched to...

Gesture of Peace Across the Years

Corporal James E. Reid, U.S. Army, was on picket duty along Wilmington Road and present at the magazine explosion, but did not participate in either assault at Fort Fisher or in the Wilmington Campaign. He wrote a series of more than 100 installments about his...

Soldier Gave Enough, or Had Enough

I got this information on James Salter Blount, my great-great-grandfather, through genealogy search. My family did not have any stories. James joined the Confederate army at age 19, mustering in in Beaufort County as a sergeant in the 36th Regiment, 2nd Company G. On...

Then It Became Civilized

Six days before his birthday Captain Ezra Lewis Moore, U.S. Army, was detailed to the staff of Joseph C. Abbott. As the battle for Fort Fisher was winding down, Capt. Moore and another officer were walking down towards the Mound Battery when they were approached by...

Brothers Separated by War

John McLaurin lived in Anson County. He was the son of Scottish immigrants Daniel and Nancy Ann (Stewart) McLaurin. John was a farmer. He never married. John joined 3rd Company G, 40th Regiment, North Carolina 3rd Artillery, in 1863 after his brother Daniel was...

Some Quiet Diplomacy at Elmira

Gideon Tyson, a private in the Confederate army, was captured at Fort Fisher. He was sent to the Elmira prison camp in New York, where a guard caught him stealing food in the kitchen area in the middle of the night. Gideon overpowered the guard with a knife, but did...

He Didn’t Lead from Behind

Col. Alonzo Alden enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1861 in the 169th New York Volunteers. He served in 29 battles and engagements during the Civil War. He was wounded at Edenton Road on April 24, 1863, at Cold Harbor on June 1, 1864, and at Fort Fisher on January 16,...

Civil War Veteran Held Civil Offices

Daniel James Clark was a captain in the Confederate States Army. He survived both the second battle for Fort Fisher and the war. After the war, he married Jemima Perry. They lived in Rosindale, in Bladen County, where he was a merchant and a farmer. Daniel was elected...

U.S. Colored Troops Active at Fort Fisher

Franklin K. Larabee, 1st lieutenant, U.S. Army, was born in 1828 in Ashtabula Ohio. In June of 1861 he enlisted for two years in the 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Franklin re‐enlisted in 1863 as a 2nd lieutenant in the 27th United States Colored Troops in Ohio and was...

Confederate Prowled Carolina Coast

Jesse Wilson, a private in the Confederate army, was born May 26, 1831, in Pitt County. In 1856 Jesse married Margaret Ann Lay, with whom he had nine children. By 1860 he was a Brunswick County resident. From 1861‐1864, Jesse served in "Galloway’s Coast Guard," whose...

To War and Back

Thomas Hickman lived near Calabash in Brunswick County and enlisted in the Confederate army along with his neighbors and several relatives, including his brother, Henry. Lt. Hickman survived the Fort Fisher battle and imprisonment. He was paroled on March 5, 1865. He...

Still Plenty of Time To Die

Henry Hickman, who lived in the Calabash area in Brunswick County, enlisted in the Confederate army on February 19, 1862, five days after the fall of New Bern. The news of the attacks along the Outer Banks was thought to be the impetus for a large number of...

There’s No Refuge in Wartime

Lawrence L. Lancaster moved from Craven County to the Lockwood Folly region of Brunswick County, where he enlisted as a private with Company K, 36th Regiment North Carolina State Troops. Lawrence was captured defending Fort Fisher on January 15, 1865. While confined...

“Deserter” came back to fight

Moses Tyson was residing in Columbus County when he enlisted in the Confederate army on March 7, 1862. Shortly after he was assigned to Company E, 36th Regiment North Carolina State Troops (3rd N.C. Artillery), he was listed as having deserted from Fort Caswell. Moses...

Fort Fisher P.O.W. Went Home and Found Love

Solomon R. Ward, a private in the Confederate army, was sent to the Elmira prison camp in New York after the fall of Fort Fisher. He was exchanged on the James River in Virginia on March 14, 1865. He was admitted to the USA Hospital Bermuda Hundred on March 21, 1865,...

Soldier Survived War and Smallpox

Solomon R. Ward, a private in the Confederate army, was sent to the Elmira prison camp in New York after the fall of Fort Fisher. He was exchanged on the James River in Virginia on March 14, 1865. Solomon was admitted to the USA Hospital Bermuda Hundred on March 21,...

He Lived To Tell The Story

Robert Morris Bloodworth, Confederate, served in Company B, 1st NC Heavy Artillery. He fought at Fort Fisher and survived the war. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our exciting project. Phone: 910-491-0602...

Union Soldier Took Up Fallen Colors at Fort Fisher

Private William Henry Freeman, U.S. Army, was the orderly of Col. Alonzo Alden, Commander of the 169th New York Regiment. In the January 15 battle for Fort Fisher, the standard bearer was seriously wounded and dropped the colors. William took up the colors, putting...

Prison Claimed Another Fort Fisher Veteran

Private Henry Anderson, Confederate States Army, served in Company D, 40th Regiment, 3rd NC Artillery. He was captured at Fort Fisher and taken to the prison at Elmira, N.Y. Henry was released July 19, 1865, but died that year due to his poor treatment while at...

Born To Fight, He Got His Wish

James Reilly, born in Ballydonagh, Ireland, on April 14, 1822, always had a passion to be a soldier. He attained the rank of major in the Confederate army. After the war, Reilly ran ferry boats in Wilmington. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our exciting...

Private Survived War and Elmira

Daniel James Allen, a private in the Confederate Army, enlisted at 18 years of age. He was captured at Fort Fisher on January 15, 1865. He was confined at Elmira, N.Y. and was released after taking the Oath of Allegiance on August 7, 1865. Want To Work With Us? Get...

From Soldiering to Farming

Samuel Jenkins Taylor enlisted in the Confederate army as a private at the age of 38. He survived Fort Fisher, and farmed after the war. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our exciting project. Phone:...

Down But Not Out at Fort Fisher

Private Charles Montgomery Grimsley, Confederate States Army, was wounded at Fort Fisher December 24‐25, 1864, but survived the war. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our exciting project. Phone: 910-491-0602...

Drummer Boy Turned His Hand to Farming

Neal Alexander Callihan of Bladen County was a Confederate drummer boy at 16. He served in 3rd Company B, 36 Regiment North Carolina Troops, and 2nd Regiment N.C. Artillery. After the war, Neal was a farmer. He lived to an old age. Want To Work With Us? Get involved...

New Beginning at War’s End

Private Richard Dishman of Brooklyn, my great-grandfather, served in the U.S. Army with the 48th New York Infantry Regiment, Company B. He survived both the struggle for Fort Fisher and the Civil War. He was mustered out in Raleigh. He married Mary Walsh, and they had...

Small Party Made a Big Haul

Private Kendrick Sunday Outlaw, Confederate army, was stationed at Fort Fisher with the North Carolina 2nd Light Artillery. He was captured on the Cape Fear River on June 25, 1864, by Lt. William B. Cushing, USN, and sent to Point Lookout, Md. as a prisoner of war....

Fort Fisher to Bladen — the Long Way Around

Wright Singletary, my great-grandfather, entered Confederate service as a private at the age of 30, and served as a cook at Fort Fisher. During the battle on January 15, 1865, he took some dramatic action with hot water when Union troops entered the fort. Wright was...

New Yorker Came South To Fight

Florence Martin was born on May 15, 1836 in New York. His parents, Nicholas and Ava, had immigrated to the United States from France in the 1830s. Florence volunteered and enlisted in the U.S. Army as a private in August, 1862, in Rome N.Y. His regiment did war duty...

Capture Idled Young Officer

Confederate Lt. Joshua Soles was with the 2nd Co. A, 36th Regiment in North Carolina. Gen. Braxton Bragg sent Joshua to help defend Savannah during Sherman’s siege. Joshua returned to Fort Fisher after the evacuation of Savannah. He fought and was captured during the...

Family Put the War Behind Them

Malcolm McDonald Hall of Sampson County, my great-great-grandfather, was a private in the Confederate army. I do not have much information on him, but I know he was from Sampson County. He was born Malcolm McDonald, but after his father's death his mother married a...

Death Reached Far Beyond the Battlefield

Neill Stephen Kinlaw of Robeson County, a private in the Confederate army, survived the assault on Fort Fisher, but not the war. Captured at Fort Fisher, he was taken to the prison camp at Elmira, N.Y. He died one month later. He was 38 years old. Want To Work With...

Young General Distinguished Himself

Robert Frederick Hoke was born in Lincolnton, N.C., to Michael Hoke and Frances Burton on May 27, 1837. On Jan. 19, 1863, at the age of 26, he was promoted to brigadier general. (He later became a major general.) Robert was wounded at Chancellorsville and therefore...

Cost of Fort Fisher Kept rising

Gary Spencer of New Hanover County, a Confederate private, lost his life in the struggle for Fort Fisher and control of the North Carolina coast. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our exciting project. Phone:...

Young Life Cut Short by War, Illness

George F. Flowers, Confederate, joined the 2nd North Carolina Light Artillery, Co. G, at age 17. He was captured on the Cape Fear River on June 25, 1864, and was sent to Fort Monroe, Va., then to Point Lookout Military Prison Camp in Maryland, where he died at age 18...

Tar Heel Soldier Died at Infamous New York Prison

Robert Ottaway enlisted in the Confederate army as a private at age 17, serving with 2nd North Carolina Light Artillery, Co. G. He was captured at Fort Fisher and was sent to the Elmira prison camp in New York. He died there of disease on May 5, 1865. Robert is buried...

Soldier Left Reminders of His War Years

Daniel J. Allen served the Confederacy in the 3rd Regiment, North Carolina Artillery. Pvt. Allen was captured on Jan. 15, 1865. He was sent to Elmira N.Y., was released, and signed the Oath of Allegiance on Aug. 7, 1865. We have in our possession this original...

Williamsons Risked All for the Confederacy

Four Williamson brothers, all in their early 20s, served in the 21st South Carolina Volunteers (Hagood’s Brigade), Co. L. Two of them, a first sergeant and a private, were killed at Fort Fisher during the second battle. The third brother, a private, was wounded and...

Smallpox Killed Elmira POW

James McKay Suggs was a private in the Confederate army, serving with the 36th North Carolina, Co. H. James died of smallpox while imprisoned at Elmira, N.Y. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our exciting project. [do_widget...

U.S. Seaman Wounded in Fisher Assault

Edward Hilton was born in 1827. As a U.S. Navy seaman, he was assigned to the USS Colorado during the second assault on Fort Fisher. He was wounded in the assault, then transferred to the USS New Hampshire, the USS Home, and the USS Vermont. He was discharged in...

Junior Reservist Made It Home

George Martin Glass, a 2nd lieutenant in the Confederate army, was a member of 4th Battalion, North Carolina Junior Reserves. He was stationed at Battery Buchanan for a time, finally surrendering in Greensboro. George farmed in Guilford County after the Civil War and...

Immigrant Served Twice in Wartime

John C. Koch, a corporal in the Confederate army, was born in 1842 in Wehldorf, a province of Hanover Germany. It is not known when John arrived in Wilmington, but he enlisted in Company A, 18th North Carolina Infantry, on April 15, 1861. He was mustered in as a...

Medal of Honor for Fort Fisher Action

Bruce Anderson of Fulton County, New York, was a member of the 142nd New York Infantry, Company K. That gave him the unusual distinction of being an African-American soldier serving in a white Civil War regiment. Having earned the Medal of Honor for his actions during...

Illness Sent New Yorker Home

Charles St. Andrews enlisted in the U.S. Army as a private in August 1862 and was a member of the 142nd New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment. His regimental commander was Colonel Newton Martin Curtis, who later won the Medal of Honor for his actions at the second...

The Biggest Killer Wasn’t Battle

Absalom Tuten Roe enlisted in the Confederate army in Beaufort County on January 25, 1862. Private Roe was involved in the construction of Fort Fisher. He arrived there on March 29 1862, with Co. B of the 40th Regiment, North Carolina Troops, 3rd North Carolina...

My Civil War Ancestor

I had three ancestors in the Civil War. This is about one from Watauga county. Benjamin Moody was conscripted/drafted by the Southern side; but after he had been in a few months, he deserted and made his way over into Tennessee, where he joined the 13th Tennessee...

Illness Ended the War for a Young Artilleryman

George F. Flowers, Private, CSA, joined the 2nd North Carolina Light Artillery, Co. G, at age 17. George was captured on the Cape Fear River on June 25, 1864, and sent to Fort Monroe, Va. He was then sent to the Point Lookout Military Prison Camp in Maryland, where he...

Reassignment spared unit from the

Jacob H. Idol (Eitel) was a private in the Confederate army. At some point, Co. A, 42nd North Carolina Infantry, were guards at the Salisbury prisoner of war camp. Some soldiers voted to go to the “Eastern Theatre” Army of Northern VA and saw action at Cold Harbor...

Artilleryman Had a Long Walk Home

Joseph Haywood Chason, from Lumber Bridge, N.C., volunteered to join the Confederacy for a three-year enlistment in February 1862. He was assigned to Fort Fisher the entire time as an artilleryman, with the rank of private. Joseph was present for the epic battle when...

New Yorker Wounded Far from Home

By: Sharon Butterfield Urgento, Dennis Urgento Charles Larkin enlisted in the U.S. Army as a private in September 1862 at Sand Lake, N.Y., at age 22. Charles served in the 169th Regiment, Co. H. A Samuel Larkin, quite likely his brother or cousin, served with him in...

Pennsylvania POW, Battle of Plymouth

In his early thirties, Martin Lybarger went to war in the 101st Pennsylvania Veterans Volunteer Infantry, leaving behind a wife and small son. He was among the Union troops captured at the Battle of Plymouth in April of 1864 and walked miles to cattle cars that...

The Bowens of Bertie heed the call

Frederick Columbus Bowen, born March 6, 1840, was the fourth child, third son, of Jesse and Margaret Bowen. He was born in Bertie County, North Carolina and lived at home with his parents where he learned to farm. He was also taught to read and write. After the Civil...

Waiting for the end in Sherman’s path

"The cloud of war is darkening and threatens to burst over our heads. Wilmington has fallen, Charleston and Columbia. Sherman is still making his onward march. Our own town is threatened and all is dismay and uncertainty." So wrote Jane Elliot from her plantation home...

A different kind of marriage

Great-Great-Granddaddy Frank Civils grew up in the Core Creek area near Asbury and had fallen in love with Mary Jane Riggs. When they decided to get married, their parents refused to allow it. Frank then married Elizabeth Daugherty on February 22, 1850, and Mary Jane...

A Civil War Christmas Story

On Christmas Day in 1862, the African American population of Washington, North Carolina organized a Christmas dinner for the Union soldiers and sailors who were stationed in Washington. The dinner was held at unoccupied store in downtown Washington and the tables were...

Big Bob, The Slave Martyr

As a little African American girl, I grew up hearing stories about Big Bob, the slave martyr who gave his life for the U.S. Army and Captain Charles Lyons on a Union vessel off Rodman's Point near Washington, N.C., March 31, 1863. It was during the Siege of Washington...

Last of the Lot

The youngest of my great-grandfather Henry’s seven brothers wasn’t just one of the boys. At fifteen, he was the only boy. That should have been enough to keep him out of service to the Confederacy and, for almost all of the war, it did. But there was a problem. By the...

Eight Is Enough

There are a couple of versions of this story in our family. My grandma's version was that there were "six sons, all over six feet tall, who went to war and all six came back." Grandma was never known for understatement, but she missed this one by two. There were, in...

Ancestor literally held the fort

I was a resident of Harnett County during my U.S. Army service at Fort Bragg, NC. I now reside in Florence County, S.C. I am a Civil War reenactor and may be found on Facebook at Frank Slemmer. An interesting note is that the first recorded ancestor, Frank Schlemmer,...

Little Schoolhouse Wedding

My great-grandfather was Needham Outlaw of Duplin and Wayne counties. He was a private in Company I, 66th Regiment of North Carolina Troops. He served as a Confederate nurse and courier between eastern North Carolina and Richmond. It is unknown how much action he saw....

Three Young Brothers of Franklin County

John Young, Jr (for whom Youngsville, N.C. was named) had three sons who served in the Civil War. Thomas Jefferson Young enlisted on Sept. 5, 1862 in Wayne County (his residence was Wake County) as a Private, age 20. He served in Co. I, 1st North Carolina Infantry. He...

Three Days in Maryland, 1862

Captain Chalmers Lanier Glenn of Rockingham County served in Company I, Third North Carolina Regiment. (William Dorsey Pender was his 1st Colonel.) Glenn was killed in the bloodbath at South Mountain on Sept. 14, 1862. Brigadier General Lawrence O'Bryan Branch of...

Horseshoes in the Belfry

During the Civil War, Kinstonians began seeking places to hide their valuables. When Rev. JB Webb, the minister of the town's local Methodist Church and owner of a local factory manufacturing goods for the Confederacy, heard that the Yankees were coming, he had...

Love in the Midst of War

Lieutenant D.A. Black was one of the "Carolina Boys" of Company K, 38th Regiment of the North Carolina Troops, under the command of Captain M. McR. McLauchlin. On May 3, 1862, Lieutenant D.A. Black wrote to a friend in North Carolina from his camp at Milford Station...

Stoneman’s Cavalry

My great-grandfather was a boy of 12 when Stoneman's cavalry raided through Western Lincoln County. As the cavalry approached, his mother loaded all the family's silverware and china into several burlap sacks, and they loaded the sacks onto their broken-down old mule....

Walking home from Richmond

My great-great-grandfather was Anthony Hohn, who came from Germany when he was seven years old. Enlisting in the Confederate army, he left his wife and two children to go to war. He was in many battles, but near the end of the war he reportedly shot someone and...

Sacrifice

Hardin Holyfield of Surry sent four sons to war. Hardin, the last of the four to join, was 14 years old. He served with the 28th N.C. infantry. He lived until 1930. My great-great grandfather, Hardin Sr., was a constable. Want To Work With Us? Get involved with our...

Merit selection, it wasn’t

If you want to know how one of the nation's premiere military installations got its name, don't expect to find the answer in the Civil War service record of Braxton Bragg, who has been called "the North's favorite Southern general." Want To Work With Us? Get involved...

U.S. History, Meet the Present

There's no shortage of innocent assumptions, sneering one-liners, pseudohistory, off-topic diversions and mindless loops regarding the causes and conduct of the Civil War. If you've had enough of that cheap beer, then buy, borrow or check out Daniel A. Farber's...

High hopes and hard war

A Texas soldier stationed in Arkansas, one of eight Reb brothers born and reared on the same Cape Fear River plantation, was reservedly optimistic as the Civil War passed its first anniversary."If I am still blessed with good health," Jimmie Smith wrote his future...

Become a Charter Member of the Friends of the History Center!

On Thursday, May 8, from 7:30 – 9:30 PM, the History Center will launch its Friends program at a special gathering at SkyView on Hay in downtown Fayetteville.  We will be premiering a special video about the History Center plans and we will be hearing from one of the...

Community Foundation Announces $500,000 Grant Investment

Leaders of Cumberland Community Foundation announced a major gift to the proposed North Carolina Civil War History Center. Plans call for the education center to be built on the grounds of the existing State-supported Museum of the Cape Fear, directly adjacent to the...

There’s no script for war

Abolish the unthinkable and you can have no more wars. Is there even a remote chance that Alexander McRae, a U.S. Army officer from Fayetteville, idly wondered during his time as a West Point cadet if he would die in New Mexico Territory battling rebels led by his...

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